A Concise History of U.S. Immigration
How Newcomers to America Went from Settlers to Immigrants
“Those who come hither are generally of the most ignorant Stupid Sort of their own Nation.” Ben Franklin

Return to Disposition of Illegal Immigrants

The Guarded Gate Bigotry, Eugenics and the Law That Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants Out
Summary from author/editor Walter Antoniotti

Prosperous German Jews were welcomed by Boston's upper crust society early in the 19th century. By the end of the century, so many really poor Eastern Europe Jews and Italians had migrated into poor sections of Boston that Henry Cabot Lodge had other Boston Brahmins  to limit immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe. Established upper crust German Jews, who called the new arrivals who spoke Yiddish-Kike, joined the fight against business lobbies (manufactures + resource gathering and European shipping companies who were stuffing immigrants the ship's hole).

Prominent Jewish association in Boston and NY had been resettling immagrants around the United States but by the end of the century, many Brahmins were lumping all Jews into one race, so these association became more helpful to new arrivals.

Many promenade American aristocrat, think FDR and Eleanor, felt that Americans with Northern and Western European heritage were committing Race Suicide by having few children and would soon be outnumbered by rapidly reproducing immigrants. The 1901associations of President McKinley by eastern Europeans move limited immigration back to the front pages.

Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882  banned Chinese laborers

Anarchist Exclusion Act of 1904

Immigration Act_of_1917

added to undesirables banned from entering the country, including: alcoholics, anarchists, contract laborers, criminals, convicts ... [17]

"Asiatic barred zone" from which people could not immigrate, including much of Asia [20]

neither Japan nor the Philippines were included in the banned zone.[20] 

increased the head tax to $8 per person

ended exclusion of Mexican workers from head tax. [5]

Immigration Act of 1917 passed Congress with an overwhelming majority,

added to undesirables banned from entering the country, including: alcoholics, anarchists, contract laborers, criminals, convicts ... [17]

created the "Asiatic barred zone" including much of Asia [20]

Neither Japan nor the Philippines were included in the banned zone.[20] 

Increased the head tax to $8 per person, and ended the exclusion of Mexican workers from the head tax.[5]

 

 

 

Debunking Immigration Myths